Insurance Damage Assessment Surveys

Insurance Damage Assessment Surveys are usually carried out on behalf on an insurer, but not in all cases. The purpose of this survey is to ascertain the cause of damage sustained to a vessel or vessels, moorings, or pontoons, and an evaluation of the cost of repair.

 

This involves meticulously detecting the extent of the damage caused to a vessel or vessels, due to collision, grounding, hitting a submerged object, fire, sinking, storm damage including lightening strikes or by any other means. 

Surveying in a methodical and meticulous manner, I work carefully to see the full extent of the damage, for example, if the vessel is involved in a collision, I start at the point of impact and steadily work outwards, just like the ripple affect from the impact itself. This way I can 'see' where the force was likely to damage the vessel, and where each area of damage may have a knock-on effect elsewhere, such as an impact to the topsides causing damage to a bulkhead, which damages the tabbing potentially causing excessive flex to the hull and damaging stringers and frames. The damage to the bulkhead may extend to the chainplates, which will inevitably extend to the rigging attachment points, and therefore the whole rig must be considered, and the hull- deck join is likely to be compromised. Furthermore, depending on the type of damage/impact sustained, impact to one side of a vessel may result in greater damage to the opposite side, and all this is carefully considered during the meticulous survey.

With a background in fibreglass boatbuilding and repairs, steel work, rigging and marine engineering, I can gauge the time, materials and costs for the remedial works. I then carry out extensive research to cross check my  assessments to reach an objective, reliable conclusion.

BOAT SURVEYS. YACHT SURVEYS. MARINE SURVEYS. MARINE SURVEYOR. YACHT SURVEYOR. BOAT SURVEYOR. MALAGA. SOUTH SPAIN. MEDITERRANEAN. BENALMADENA. MARBELLA. GIBRALTAR. FUENGIROLA.

Testing for rot beneath bulkhead tabbing on a vessel which was recovered from the river bed. Meticulously testing the extent of the damage is vital if conclusions are to be objective and holistic.

BOAT SURVEYS. YACHT SURVEYS. MARINE SURVEYS. MARINE SURVEYOR. YACHT SURVEYOR. BOAT SURVEYOR. MALAGA. SOUTH SPAIN. MEDITERRANEAN. BENALMADENA. MARBELLA. GIBRALTAR. FUENGIROLA.

Following a grounding, this vessel showed a clear sign of structural damage, as the door of the main bulkhead didn't fit in its frame. Alas, the main structural reinforcement has been compromised. 

BOAT SURVEYS. YACHT SURVEYS. MARINE SURVEYS. MARINE SURVEYOR. YACHT SURVEYOR. BOAT SURVEYOR. MALAGA. SOUTH SPAIN. MEDITERRANEAN. BENALMADENA. MARBELLA. GIBRALTAR. FUENGIROLA.

Keel damage due to grounding has damaged the lead ballast. However, being a relatively soft material, the damage was largely limited to this area.

BOAT SURVEYS. YACHT SURVEYS. MARINE SURVEYS. MARINE SURVEYOR. YACHT SURVEYOR. BOAT SURVEYOR. MALAGA. SOUTH SPAIN. MEDITERRANEAN. BENALMADENA. MARBELLA. GIBRALTAR. FUENGIROLA.

Rudder stops have been removed on this vessel, so the rudder turns beyond its normal scope. It has been pressed into the mud at low tide at this obtuse angle multiple times which has caused the plywood structure to split open.